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  Texas Storms, September 1, 2002-1976 Storms
67 storms: sorted by date. Select Dates From Timeline
 

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1.  
Central Texas
June 30-July 7, 2002
On June 30, 2002, a low-pressure system migrating westward from Florida combined with a flow of deep tropical moisture from the Gulf of Mexico and moved over southern Texas. The system hit a wall of high pressure and stalled over the central and south-central parts of the State. For 8 days, the storm system continued to draw moisture from the Gulf, which triggered several massive storms throughout much of the area. As much as 35 in. of rain fell during the event, with heaviest depths occurring in the Texas Hill Country northwest of San Antonio. Flooding affected about 80 counties in Texas.

Heavy rain also fell in parts of West Texas, including Abilene, where 12-14 in. of rain in the pre-dawn hours of July 6 caused flooding that required numerous evacuations. Heavy rains also caused Lake Brownwood to overflow, causing evacuations and flooding in parts of Brownwood.

The floods caused 12 deaths and damage to about 48,000 homes. Nearly 250 flood rescue calls were reported, more than 130 roads were closed, and thousands of homes and businesses lost electrical power and telephone service. Twenty-four counties were identified by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) as Federal Declared Disaster areas—14 counties were eligible for individual assistance and 10 counties for individual and public assistance. Emergency management representatives had not yet assessed the total cost of damages.

The storms produced large volumes of runoff and as many as four flood peaks at each of many streamflow-gaging stations in the Brazos, Colorado, and Guadalupe River Basins. Record flood stages occurred at sites on the Medina River, San Antonio River, Sabinal River, and Nueces River. For the first time since it filled in 1968, Canyon Lake (northeast of San Antonio) poured over its spillway, adding to the flooding in the Guadalupe River. Emergency managers also were concerned about the 90-year-old dam at Medina Lake (west of San Antonio). Medina Lake topped its spillway and rose to within 18 in. of the top of the dam. Areas downstream from the dam were evacuated as a precaution because of the fear of dam failure.
Deaths and Damage:   Twelve deaths occurred during the flooding and damages were estimated to be about $1 billion.
Max. Precipitation:   35.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Kerr Co.
Kendall Co.
Taylor Co., Abilene
References:   http://tx.usgs.gov/

USGS_77


2.  
Central Texas See floodsafety.com.
November 15, 2001

The storm of November 15, 2001, began with mild to moderate rainfall over the night of November 14th and through the morning of November 15th. At about 3:30 p.m. on November 15th, a large thunderstorm cell began to approach the Hays-Travis County line, with tornadoes and intense rainfall. The tornadoes touched at various locations along the I-35 corridor starting near Buda and the Ben White Blvd. - I-35 interchange and continuing north and east through Travis County. The heaviest rainfall began about 3:30 p.m. over south-central Austin in the middle of the Slaughter Creek Basin and upper South Boggy Creek Basin. The intense thunderstorm cells continued to track rapidly and generally north-northeast over Barton Creek at Loop 360, West Bouldin Creek, Johnson Creek, and Shoal Creek. The area of the most intense rainfall decreased as it tracked farther north over the upper Little Walnut and Walnut Creek watersheds. Although the storm gradually decreased in intensity over the next 6 hours, it continued to produce intense rainfall.

Widespread rainfall totals typically ranged from 5 to 8 in., with individual reports of 10 in. and more. Much of this rain fell within about 6 hours. Generally, the storm intensities and flood levels were higher on the south and west sides of Austin. Rainfall intensities exceeded the estimated 100-year rainfall rates in some locations and caused widespread but isolated flood damage where the drainage capacity of streets and storm drains was exceeded by localized rainfall.

The flow measured in area creeks does not match the statistical significance of individual maximum rainfall measurements because the intense rainfall was not evenly distributed over all of the watersheds. For example, the USGS estimated that the flood peak in Onion Creek at U.S. Highway 183 was approximately 93,200 cubic feet per second, which corresponds to about a 50-year peak. Other watersheds on the south and west (for example, Slaughter, Williamson, South Boggy, West and East Bouldin, Barton, Bull, Johnson, and Shoal Creeks) experienced flood peaks that correspond to a return period of 5 to 20 years. The USGS gage on Shoal Creek at W. 12th Street recorded a peak corresponding to approximately a 10-year return period. Watersheds on the east side of town (for example, Waller, Boggy, Tannehill, Fort, and Buttermilk Creeks) were less affected and experienced flood peaks corresponding to return periods of less than 10 years. Other watersheds that flow from northwest to east (for example, Little Walnut and Walnut Creeks) experienced peaks corresponding to return periods of up to 10 years.

Deaths and Damage:   968 homes were flooded and cost of damages to public property was 11.3 million dollars.
Max. Precipitation:   14.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Travis Co
References:   http://tx.usgs.gov/

Report assisted by City of Austin.


COA 1


3.  
Southeast Texas See floodsafety.com
June 6 to 9, 2001
Twenty-seven counties were declared federal disaster areas after as much as 36 in. of rainfall from Tropical Storm Allison fell on the area.
Deaths and Damage:   Twenty-three deaths occurred. Damages claimed at least 5,000 buildings, about 10,000 homes, and were assessed at about $5 billion dollars.
Max. Precipitation:   36.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Houston
References:   http://tx.usgs.gov/


USGS_68

4.  
South-Central Texas See floodsafety.com
October 17 to 18, 1998
Up to 30 in. of rainfall occurred in a 2-day period—about 5,000 mi2 in parts of 19 counties received at least 8 in. of rain. Thirteen streamflow-gaging stations in the Guadalupe and San Antonio River Basins recorded peak discharges equal to or greater than the 100-year peak and record-breaking peak discharges were recorded at 11 of the stations. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Thirty-two lives were lost and property damage was estimated to be $500 million.
Max. Precipitation:   30.00 in. (Hays Co.)
22.00 in. (Comal Co.)
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Hays Co., San Marcos
Comal Co.
References:  

Slade and Persky, 1999
http://water.usgs.gov/pubs/FS/FS-147-99/



98_Flood

5.  
South-Central Texas
August 22, 1998
Up to 16 in. of rainfall in south-central Texas caused flooding in many counties, with the city of Del Rio receiving the worst damages. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Thirteen lives were claimed.
Max. Precipitation:   16.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Val Verde Co., Del Rio
References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999


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NWS_41

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NWS_43

6.  
South-Central Texas
June 21 to 22, 1997
Up to 18 in. of rainfall occurred in a 2-day period on an area covering parts of 18 south-central Texas counties. Record-breaking peak discharges were recorded at eight streamflow-gaging stations in the area. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   The total property damage for which owners were eligible for disaster assistance was about $10.4 million.
Max. Precipitation:   18.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Kendall Co., Sisterdale
References:   Raines and others, 1998


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7.  
Southeast Texas
April 10, 1997
Up to 13 in. of rainfall in southeast Texas caused flooding in parts of the Lavaca River Basin. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   13.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Lavaca Co., Shiner
References:   John Patton, National Weather Service, written commun., 1999

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8.  
Central Texas
February 20, 1997
Up to 8 in. of rainfall near Harper caused flooding in the Devils, Pedernales, and Llano River Basins.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   8.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Gillespie Co., Harper
References:   John Patton, National Weather Service, written commun., 1999

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9.  
Val Verde County
February 20, 1997
Up to about 7.6 in. of rainfall caused flooding on the Pedernales and James Rivers. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   7.60 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Val Verde Co., Del Rio
References:   None

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10.  
South-Central Texas
October 27 to 28, 1996
Up to 12 in. of rainfall in a 2-day period in south-central Texas caused flooding in the Nueces, Dry Frio, and Guadalupe River Basins. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   12.00 in. (Gillespie Co.)
11.00 in. (Edwards Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Gillespie Co., Harper
Edwards Co., Rocksprings
References:   John Patton, National Weather Service, written commun., 1999

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11.  
  Dallas and Tarrant Counties
May 5, 1995
Damage caused by wind speeds up to 70 miles per hour, softball-size hail, and high-intensity rain caused this storm to be deemed the "costliest thunderstorm event in history" by the National Weather Service. The maximum rainfall intensity was almost 3 in. in 30 minutes. 109 people were injured by hail.
  Deaths and Damage:   20 lives were lost, and $2 billion in damage was reported.
  Max. Precipitation:   4.96 in.
  Severity:   Major Storm
  Storm Center(s):  

Dallas Co., Dallas
Tarrant Co.

  References:   None

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12.  
Llano and Gillespie Counties
May 29, 1995
Rainfall depths up to 8 in. caused flooding in parts of Williamson, Mason, Llano, and Gillespie Counties. The largest flood damages occurred in Sandy Creek and Lake LBJ. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   Unknown
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Williamson Co.
Mason Co.
Llano Co.
Gillespie Co.
References:   John Patton, National Weather Service, written commun., 1999

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13.  
Montgomery County  
May 29, 1995
Up to 19 in. of rainfall caused flooding on Cypress and Spring Creeks and the West and East Forks of San Jacinto River. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   About 16,000 homes were damaged and 22 flood deaths were reported.
Max. Precipitation:   19.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Montgomery Co., Conroe
References:   None

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14.  
Southeast Texas
October 15 to 19, 1994
A tropical, mid-latitude rainfall of unusual proportion on a 30- to 35-county area of southeast Texas resulted in catastrophic flooding. The intense rainfalls totaled more than 25 in. at several locations and more than 8 in. on much of southeast Texas.
Deaths and Damage:   Flooding caused 18 deaths and property damage was estimated to be about $700 million.
Max. Precipitation:   12.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Nacogdoches Co., Chireno
References:   Liscum and East, 1995; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1995


USGS_78

15.  
Bexar County
May 5, 1993
Up to 8 in. of rainfall in Bexar County produced large peaks on Olmos Creek and Salado Creek. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   8.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Bexar Co.
References:   None

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16.  
South-Central Texas
May 16 to 17, 1992
Heavy rainfall in Wilson County caused the bridge over Loop 181 on Kicaster Creek near Floresville to fail.
Deaths and Damage:   Bridge over Loop 181 on Kicaster Creek near Floresville failed.
Max. Precipitation:   Unknown
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Wilson Co., Floresville
References:   None


USGS_67

17.  
Central Texas See floodsafety.com
December 18 to 23, 1991
Record-breaking peak discharges were recorded at several streamflow-gaging stations in a large area of central Texas Dec. 18-23. Daily rainfall totals exceeded 4 in. at numerous locations. Maximum recorded 24-hour rainfall was 8.6 in., and maximum recorded 12-hour rainfall was 7.3 in., both at Evant in Coryell County. Medina had 15.59 in. during 5 days. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Ten deaths were attributed to the flooding. The Federal Emergency Management Agency dispensed about $43 million.
Max. Precipitation:   8.60 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Coryell Co., Evant
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Hejl and others, 1996


NWS_32



NWS_33

18.  
North Texas
May 1 to 7, 1990
Heavy rainfall May 1-4 produced major flooding in North Texas during early May. Rainfall was 5-9 in. on north-central sections of North Texas and 2-5 in. elsewhere.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   6.91 in. (Dallas Co.)
6.36 in. (Dallas Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Dallas Co., Dallas Naval Air Station
Dallas Co., Dallas Love Field
References:   National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1990


NWS_31
|


USGS_75

19.  
Brown County
April 25, 1990
As much as 16 in. of rain fell during a 24-hour period. Brownwood Airport measured 16.05 in. Flooding was the worst in the Brownwood area since 1954.
Deaths and Damage:   About 1,300 people were evacuated from low-lying areas of Brown County. Floods caused millions of dollars in damages.
Max. Precipitation:   16.05 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Brown Co., Brownwood
References:   Paulson and others, 1993, p. 26

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20.  
Southwest Texas
June 26 to July 7, 1989
Tropical Storm Allison caused torrential rains of 10-15 in. from Houston to Beaumont. Houston Intercontinental Airport recorded 10.34 in. during 24 hours.
Deaths and Damage:   Heavy rains caused major flooding that was responsible for three deaths and estimated damages of $60 million.
Max. Precipitation:   10.34 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Houston Intercontinental Airport
References:   Griffiths and others, 1990, p. 42-44

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21.  
Upper Coast and North Texas
May 16 to 19, 1989
Houston Intercontinental Airport recorded 10.28 in. May 17-18. Spring recorded more than 15 in. during a 24-hour period May 17-18. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Widespread rains caused flooding that resulted in five deaths and total damages of about $50 million.
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in. (Harris Co.)
10.28 in. (Harris Co.)
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Spring
Harris Co., Houston Intercontinental Airport
References:   Griffiths and others, 1990, p. 38-40

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22.  
East Texas
March 28 to 29, 1989
Heavy rainfall from strong thunderstorms fell on East Texas. Rain gages recorded 14.16 in. at Longview, 12.17 in. at Atlanta, and 11.05 in. at Henderson.
Deaths and Damage:   Flooding caused the death of one man and estimated damages of $10-16 million.
Max. Precipitation:   14.16 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Gregg Co., Longview
Harrison Co.
References:   Griffiths and others, 1990, p. 31-32

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23.  
South Texas
September 16 to 18, 1988
Heavy rain caused by remnants of Hurricane Gilbert began during the morning Sept. 16 in South Texas. Heaviest reported rainfall was 8.71 in. Sept. 16-18 at Lamar in Aransas County. In the lower Rio Grande Valley, 6.40 in. fell at Adams Gardens.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   8.71 in. (Aransas Co.)
6.40 in. (Cameron Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Aransas Co., Lamar
Cameron Co., Adams Gardens
References:   National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1988, p. 41-42

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24.  
North-Central Texas
June 1, 1988
Intense thunderstorms during the night June 1 dumped more than 10 in. on Comanche County. The storm caused flooding in more than a dozen counties.
Deaths and Damage:   Damage was estimated at $3-5 million.
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Comanche Co., Comanche
References:   Paulson and others, 1991, p. 23

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25.  
Near Paint Rock on Concho River
May 11, 1988
Intense rainfall of 2-3 in. caused a flash flood on the Concho River near Paint Rock.
Deaths and Damage:   In nearby San Angelo, floodwaters swept away one person.
Max. Precipitation:   3.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Concho Co., Paint Rock
References:   Paulson and others, 1991, p. 23

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26.  
Hill Country
July 16 to 17, 1987
During the evening July 16 and early morning July 17, storms produced flash floods across seven counties north and northwest of San Antonio. Heavy rains in Kerrville began at 4:00 a.m., and by dawn 3.3 in. had fallen. As much as 11.50 in. of rain fell at Hunt, with 5-10 in. on surrounding areas. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Flooding caused tragic loss of life when a church bus filled with 39 teenagers and 4 adults was swept into a raging river. Ten persons drowned and the remaining 33 were rescued by helicopter.
Max. Precipitation:   11.50 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Kerr Co., Hunt
References:   National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1987, p. 14-16

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27.  
South-Central Texas
May 29 to June 13, 1987
Two weeks of intense rainfall in south-central Texas caused flooding in the Medina, Colorado, Guadalupe, and San Antonio River Basins. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Kinney Co., Brackettville
References:   John Patton, National Weather Service, written commun., 1999

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28.  
Extreme South Texas
February 6, 1987
Torrential rains of 6-7 in. fell during a 2-hour period in parts of Brownsville in Cameron County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   7.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Cameron Co., Brownsville
References:   Carr and others, 1990, p. 21

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29.  
Southwest Texas
October 4 to 5, 1986
In northern Val Verde County, 10-15 in. of rain Oct. 5 caused severe flooding on the Devils and Dry Devils Rivers. McCamey in southwestern Upton County reported 16.21 in. during 24 hours.
Deaths and Damage:   One drowning occurred when a car was washed off a road
Max. Precipitation:   16.21 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Upton Co., McCamey
References:   Carr and others, 1990, p. 18

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30.  
East Texas
June 26 to 29, 1986
Torrential rains of 6 in. or more caused widespread flooding, including about 150 mi along the downstream one-half of the Neches River. Ace in southern Polk County had 13 in.
Deaths and Damage:   More than 23,000 people were evacuated from the Texas-Louisiana coastal area, where sustained wind and water damage was at least $1.5 million.
Max. Precipitation:   13.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Polk Co., Ace
References:   National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1986, p. 52

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31.  
San Antonio
June 4, 1986
San Antonio reported 6.5 in. during 24 hours. Other unofficial amounts of about 10 in. caused widespread flash flooding. Subsequent river flooding lasted for several days along Medina and San Antonio Rivers.
Deaths and Damage:   Local damage was estimated at $3 million.
Max. Precipitation:   6.50 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Bexar Co., San Antonio
References:   National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1986, p. 13

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32.  
Fort Worth
May 24, 1986
The storm produced winds as strong as 95 miles per hour, hail as large as 3-in. in diameter, and about 4 in. of rain during an hour.
Deaths and Damage:   Two people drowned when swept from their car after driving into a flooded underpass. Wind, rain, and flood damage was estimated at about $2 million.
Max. Precipitation:   4.77 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Wise Co., Bridgeport
References:   Moody and others, 1988, p. 22

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33.  
Northeast Texas
April 3 to 5, 1986
In Grayson County, 5-7 in. of rain in less than 2 hours caused severe flooding.
Deaths and Damage:   Flooding in Sherman caused damages estimated at $1.3 million.
Max. Precipitation:   7.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Grayson Co., Sherman
References:   Moody and others, 1988, p. 21

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34.  
Southeast Texas
November 11 to 12, 1985
Intense rains of 5-21 in. caused widespread flooding in a 10-county area bordering and west of Houston. Garwood in Colorado County recorded 21 in. The most severely flooded areas were in Colorado County from south of Eagle Lake to the communities of Garwood and Lissie.
Deaths and Damage:   The bridge over San Bernard River on Highway 59 was under 4 ft of water.
Max. Precipitation:   21.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Colorado Co., Garwood
References:   Moody and others, 1988, p. 18

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35.  
Texas Plains
October 9 to 10, 1985
Rains on the Texas Plains were generally 2-4 in. and on parts of the eastern and southern Panhandle were slightly more than 6 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   6.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Midland Co., Midland
References:   National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1985, p. 10

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36.  
Hidalgo County
May 15, 1985
In extreme southern Texas, 5-10 in. of rain May 15 caused extensive flooding in and around the town of Mission.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Hidalgo Co., Mission
References:   Moody and others, 1986

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37.  
North Texas
April 27 to 28, 1985
Intense thunderstorms covered most of North Texas during the late evening Apr. 27 and early morning Apr. 28. About 10 in. of rain fell 9:00 to 11:00 p.m. near Rockwall in Rockwall County.
Deaths and Damage:   Eight people drowned as a result of driving into high waters.
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Rockwall Co., Rockwall
References:   Moody and others, 1986

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38.  
South-Central Texas
December 31, 1984
Heavy rain (as much as 6 in.) fell in Kimble and Kerr Counties, and as much as 9 in. fell in Real and Uvalde Counties. These rains caused widespread flash flooding and accompanying damages along tributaries of the Llano River and the headwaters of the Guadalupe, Frio, and Sabinal Rivers.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   9.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Real Co.
Uvalde Co.
References:   Moody and others, 1986

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39.  
North Houston
October 25, 1984
Heavy rains began about 7:00 a.m. in western Harris County and northern Fort Bend County. Houston Intercontinental Airport measured as much as 10 in.
Deaths and Damage:   About 650 homes were flooded, and damage was an estimated $4.1 million.
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Houston Intercontinental Airport
References:   National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1984b, p. 26

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40.  
Jim Wells, Nueces, Refugio, and San Patricio Counties
October 19, 1984
Strong thunderstorms along a stationary front north of Corpus Christi produced heavy downpours Oct. 19 that resulted in serious flash flooding. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Odem in San Patricio County had an unofficial total of 25 in. during a 3.5-hour period, making the event one of the largest depths for this duration in the United States.
Max. Precipitation:   25.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   San Patricio Co., Odem
References:   National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1984b, p. 25

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41.  
South Texas
September 16 to 19, 1984
Heavy rains, some exceeding 20 in., drenched the lower Rio Grande Valley.
Deaths and Damage:   Cameron and Willacy Counties experienced the worst flooding since Hurricane Beulah in 1967. It was estimated that more than 50 percent of the eastern one-half of Cameron County was underwater.
Max. Precipitation:   20.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Cameron Co., Harlingen
Willacy Co., Raymondville
References:   National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1984a, p. 20, 32

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42.  
East Texas
December 10 to 11, 1983
Heavy rains of as much as 10 in. caused local flooding in San Augustine County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   San Augustine Co.,
San Augustine
References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999

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43.  
Southern High Plains
October 18 to 20, 1983
Record-breaking rainfall flooded Lubbock and many areas around Lubbock. Several rain gages, including Lubbock, Brownfield, and Paducah, measured 7 in. or more. Many other stations measured 5-7 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   7.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Lubbock Co., Lubbock
References:   National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1983, p. 19

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44.  
South Texas
September 15, 1983
Flash floods in several parts of South Texas resulted in 3-7 in. or more of rain Sept. 18-19.
Deaths and Damage:   Flooding was widespread in Bexar County, where one person was killed. In the Houston area, three people drowned during the widespread flooding.
Max. Precipitation:   Unknown
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):  

Bexar Co., San Antonio,
Harris Co., Houston

References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999

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45.  
Houston Vicinity
August 17 to 19, 1983
Rainfall from Hurricane Alicia averaged 4-11 in. across the Houston area. Typical amounts were 5-9 in. Maximum recorded rainfall was 10.75 in. on the northeast side of Houston.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   10.75 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Houston
References:   Lambeth, 1983

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46.  
Panhandle and Trans-Pecos Region
September 28 to October 1, 1982
Residue from Hurricane Paul caused 3-day rains over West Texas and the Panhandle. El Paso had 2 in. during a 12-hour period Sept. 30, a record intensity. Maximum storm rainfall was 2.26 in. during the 24 hours ending Oct. 1 at Ysleta in El Paso County. In the Panhandle, Dalhart in Dallam County had 1.74 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   2.26 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   El Paso Co., Ysleta
References:   Bomar, 1983b, p. 98-103

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47.  
North and East Texas
May 11 to 14, 1982
Rainfall totals for a 24-hour period ending May 13 were 13.02 in. at Trenton in Fannin County, 13.00 in. at Pilot Point in Denton County, and 12.60 in. at Bonham in Fannin County.
Deaths and Damage:   Millions of dollars in damage were sustained.
Max. Precipitation:   13.00 in. (Denton Co.)
12.60 in. (Fannin Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Denton Co., Pilot Point
Fannin Co., Bonham
References:   Bomar, 1983b, p. 24

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48.  
South-Central Texas
February 24 to 26, 1982
The storm produced 3-5 in. of rain between Corpus Christi and Matagorda from Feb. 25 until morning Feb. 26. Maximum recorded rainfall was 6.17 in. at Point Comfort in Calhoun County.
Deaths and Damage:   Floodwaters caused one drowning.
Max. Precipitation:   6.17 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Calhoun Co., Point Comfort
References:   Bomar, 1983b, p. 16-17

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49.  
Southeast Texas
February 18 to 21, 1982
The storms dumped about 6 in. of rain in less than 3 hours at Harlingen. Nearby Adams Gardens had 7.42 in. during 1 day. Heavy thunderstorms dumped 3-4 in. of rain on Karnes and Atascosa Counties Feb. 20.
Deaths and Damage:   Damage to property was $250,000 in Cameron County.
Max. Precipitation:   7.42 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Cameron Co., Adams Gardens
References:   Bomar, 1983b, p. 14-15

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50.  
South-Central Texas
October 30 to 31, 1981
Flood-producing rains extended along the coastline from Corpus Christi to Port O'Connor and straight northward from these two points for about 120 mi inland. Six storm centers in south-central Texas had 6-13 in. of rain. Maximum recorded rainfall was 13.20 in. at La Grange in Fayette County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   13.20 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Fayette Co., La Grange
References:   National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1981

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51.  
North-Central Texas and Oklahoma
October 10 to 14, 1981
The storm extended in a southwest-to-northeast direction from near Abilene to near McAlester, Okla. Maximum recorded rainfall was 23 in. during 34 hours about 5 mi north of Clyde, Tex. Numerous areas reported rains exceeding 10 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Six lives were lost, and damage was about $115 million.
Max. Precipitation:   23.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Callahan Co., Clyde
References:   Buckner and Kurklin, 1984

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52.  
Southeastern and South-Central Texas
August 31, 1981
Heavy storms caused considerable flooding in more than a dozen counties in southeastern Texas from Brooks County in southern Texas to as far north as Caldwell and Bastrop Counties. About 20 in. was recorded in the Lavaca River Basin. Karnes City in Karnes County had 16.29 in. of rain during a 24-hour period. Unofficial totals were as much as 19 and 21 in. in other parts of the State. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Flash flooding from the rains killed five people and caused millions of dollars in damages.
Max. Precipitation:   16.29 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Karnes Co., Karnes City
References:   Bomar, 1982

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53.  
Austin Vicinity
May 24 to 25, 1981
A short-duration, intense rainfall caused the worst flooding since 1935 on many of the small watersheds in and around Austin. The rainfall began at 9:30 p.m. May 24 and ended shortly before midnight May 25. Some locations had more than 10 in. of rain during 4 hours. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Thirteen people drowned in flash flooding, and property damage was reported at $35.5 million.
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Travis Co., Austin
References:   Massey and others, 1982; Moore and others, 1982


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54.  
South Texas
May 1 to 4, 1981
Heavy thunderstorms produced rains of 2-5 in. on much of the southeastern one-half of the State. Houston Hobby Airport recorded 9.48 in. during 24 hours May 3. San Jacinto Dam recorded 8.53 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   9.48 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Houston Hobby Airport
References:   Bomar, 1982, p. 15-18

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55.  
North, West, and East Texas
September 24 to 29, 1980
Rains of 8-9 in. fell on most of Texas. Particularly hard hit were Fisher, Mitchell, Nolan, and Scurry Counties.
Deaths and Damage:   Damage was an estimated $2.2 million.
Max. Precipitation:   9.00 in. (Mitchell Co.)
8.00 in. (Fisher Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Fisher Co.
Mitchell Co.
Nolan Co.
Scurry Co.
References:   Bomar, 1983a, p. 50-52

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56.  
Central and East Texas
September 5 to 10, 1980
Tropical Storm Danielle produced torrential rains over a large part of Texas. Jefferson and Orange Counties had 12-16 in. of rain. In Kimble County, downpours of 25 in. caused massive flooding along the Llano River. The San Angelo area in Tom Green County had 5-9 in. of rain. The effects of Danielle were felt as far west as Big Bend National Park, where 4-8 in. fell.
Deaths and Damage:   Floodwaters damaged about 900 homes, 175 businesses, and hundreds of automobiles. Kimble, Mason, Menard, and Llano Counties had damages totaling $20 million.
Max. Precipitation:   25.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Kimble Co., Junction
References:   Bomar, 1983a, p. 88-94

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57.  
Trans-Pecos Region
August 10 to 15, 1980
Five-day rains produced by residue from Hurricane Allen fell on the Trans-Pecos area. Flash floods raged on the Pecos and Devils Rivers, causing some roads to be closed. More than 6 in. of rain fell on the Chisos Basin of Big Bend National Park.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   6.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Brewster Co., Chicos Basin
References:   Bomar, 1983a, p. 88-90

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58.  
Southeast Texas
August 5 to 12, 1980
Almost all of the southern one-fourth of Texas had at least 5 in. of rain from Hurricane Allen. Three-day rainfall totals exceeding 15 in. were reported in parts of Jim Wells and Hidalgo Counties and around Aransas Pass.
Deaths and Damage:   Three people drowned in the storm surge, and damage to property was estimated at $650-700 million.
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   San Patricio Co., Aransas Pass
Nueces Co.
References:   Bomar, 1983a, p. 84-88

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59.  
East Texas and Upper Coast
September 17 to 21, 1979
Three-day rainfall totals throughout the upper coast were 8-27 in. Freeport in Brazoria County recorded 27 in. of rain.
Deaths and Damage:   Four people drowned, and damage was estimated at $8 million.
Max. Precipitation:   27.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Brazoria Co., Freeport
References:   Bomar, 1980, p. 429-436

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60.  
East Texas and Upper Coast
July 24 to 28, 1979
Continuous, torrential rains fell in the eastern upper coast and southeastern Texas for almost 48 hours causing major flooding that closed streets and highways and forced hundreds of residents from their homes. Rainfall totals of 10-20 in. for 2 and 3 days were common. Alvin in Brazoria County recorded the maximum 24-hour rainfall on record for the United States of 43 in. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   43.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Brazoria Co., Alvin
References:   Bomar, 1980, p. 369-375

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61.  
Parts of Upper Coast
April 18 to 21, 1979
Some of the worst flooding ever to hit Montgomery County resulted from rains Apr. 18 that totaled 12 in. or more in less than 12 hours. About 10 in. was recorded during 3 hours at Splendora. As much as 14 in. was recorded in the vicinity of Conroe during an 8-hour period beginning just before dawn.
Deaths and Damage:   Almost 2,000 residents were evacuated from their homes. The storm caused $50 million of damages in Conroe and another $50 million in other parts of Montgomery County.
Max. Precipitation:   14.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Montgomery Co., Conroe
References:   Bomar, 1980, p. 225-227

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62.  
Trans-Pecos Region
September 24 to 25, 1978
Tropical Storm Paul produced 4 to 8 in. of rain in the western and southern Trans-Pecos region. As much as 15 in. fell in and around Guadalupe National Park Sept. 25. The rain deluged northern Mexico and filled reservoirs there to levels that mandated record releases down the Rio Conchos into the Rio Grande at Presidio, causing the worst flooding along the Rio Grande in 74 years.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Hudspeth Co., Guadalupe National Park
Culberson Co.
References:   Bomar, 1979, p. 32-33

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63.  
Central Texas
August 1 to 4, 1978
Rain initiated by the remnants of Tropical Storm Amelia fell over Central Texas Aug. 1- 4. Rainfall of more than 48 in. near Medina in Bandera County established a U.S. record of extreme point rainfall for a 72-hour period. A second storm resulted from the interaction of a cold front with a maritime air mass producing 32.5 in. at Albany in Shackelford County, with 23 in. during the 8 hours ending 2:00 a.m. Aug. 4. Major flooding occurred on the Medina and Guadalupe Rivers. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Thirty-three lives were lost, and total damages reportedly exceeded $110 million.
Max. Precipitation:   48.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):  

Shackelford Co., Albany
Bandera Co.

References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Schroeder and others, 1987


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64.  
The Woodlands
June 7, 1978
Rain from a relatively short-duration, high-intensity thunderstorm fell from about midnight to 4:00 a.m. during the morning June 7. Rainfall of 6.3 in. during 24 hours was recorded at W.G. Jones State Forest. The Woodlands fire station reported 7.0 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   7.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., The Woodlands
References:   Farner & Winslow, Inc., 1978

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65.  
Palo Duro Canyon State Park
May 26 to 27, 1978
Rainfall during the period averaged 4-10 in. on the High Plains. A 10-in. rain during 90 minutes sent a 12-ft wall of water surging through scenic Palo Duro Canyon State Park. Flooding also was widespread in other areas of Randall County.
Deaths and Damage:   Four people drowned, and $8-10 million in damages resulted.
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Randall Co., Palo Duro Canyon State Park
References:   Bomar, 1979, p. 7; U.S. Geological Survey, unpub. data

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66.  
North-Central Texas
March 27, 1977
Heavy rain fell in Tarrant, Somervell, and Dallas Counties.
Deaths and Damage:   There were 5 drownings and $1 million in property damages.
Max. Precipitation:   Unknown
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Tarrant Co.
Somervell Co.
Dallas Co.
References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999

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67.  
South Houston
June 15, 1976
The majority of rain fell on a small area. Hunting Bayou at Loop 610 recorded 10.2 in. during 6 hours.
Deaths and Damage:   Floodwaters caused eight deaths and damages exceeded $25 million.
Max. Precipitation:   10.20 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Houston
References:   Rice Center, 1980

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