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  Texas Storms, 1975-1951 Storms
67 storms: sorted by date. Select Dates From Timeline
 
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1.  
Austin Vicinity
May 23, 1975
Heavy rainfall.
Deaths and Damage:   Four people drowned and about $5 million in property damages.
Max. Precipitation:   Unknown
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Travis Co., Austin
References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999

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2.  
Nacogdoches County
January 31 to February 1, 1975
Heavy rainfall caused local flooding.
Deaths and Damage:   Three lives lost and about $5.5 in property damages.
Max. Precipitation:   Unknown
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Nacogdoches Co., Nacogdoches
References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999

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3.  
Central Texas
November 23, 1974
Heavy rainfall in Travis County caused flooding that claimed 13 lives and $1 million in property damages.
Deaths and Damage:   Thirteen lives lost and $1 million in property damages.
Max. Precipitation:   Unknown
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Travis Co., Austin
References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999

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4.  
Rio Grande Watershed
September 14 to 25, 1974
Rainfall during the period averaged about 8 in. on the entire watershed from Fort Quitman in Hudspeth County to Amistad Dam in Val Verde County, 10.5 in. in the Pecos River watershed and 8.5 in. in the Devils River watershed. Extremely heavy rains fell on localized areas of both the Pecos River and Devils River watersheds. Continental Ranch in the Pecos River watershed recorded a total of 23 in. during 9 days. In the Devils River watershed, a total of 21.58 in. of rain fell at Walker Ranch during 6 days. Bakers Crossing had almost 12 in. of rain during 24 hours.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   23.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Hudspeth Co., Continental Ranch
References:   International Boundary and Water Commission, 1974

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5.  
El Paso
June 10, 1974
Heavy rain fell in and around El Paso June 10. The Hercules fire station recorded 0.95 in. from 5:00 to 7:30 p.m. The Ysleta fire station recorded 0.62 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   0.95 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   El Paso Co., El Paso
References:   U.S. Geological Survey, unpub. data

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6.  
Seguin and Vicinity
September 26 to 27, 1973
A severe frontal storm passed over Guadalupe County during the night Sept. 26 and morning Sept. 27 with rains of 2-12 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Flood damage was $2.5 million in the Seguin area.
Max. Precipitation:   12.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Guadalupe Co., Seguin
References:   Diniz, 1973

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7.  
Southeast Texas
June 12 to 13, 1973
A massive storm in the area of Houston, Liberty, and Conroe produced 10-15 in. of rain.
Deaths and Damage:   About 10 deaths occurred and about $50 million in damages.
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Houston
References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999

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8.  
New Braunfels
May 11 to 12, 1972
During a 4-hour period, 16 in. of rain fell in the San Marcos area in Hays and Caldwell Counties.The National Weather Service reports that about 12 in. of rain fell in about 1 hour. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Seventeen lives were lost to the rampaging floodwaters that inundated 400 homes and caused about $17.5 million in damages.
Max. Precipitation:   16.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Hays Co., San Marcos
Caldwell Co.
References:   Colwick and others, 1972

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9.  
South Texas and Coastal Bend
September 7 to 13, 1971
Hurricane Fern dumped heavy rainfall as it moved along the coast and inland. The heaviest rainfall was in the Coastal Bend area and extreme South Texas. Maximum recorded precipitation was 22.67 in. at Kaffie Ranch, about 27 mi southwest of Falfurrias in Brooks County. A bucket survey in Bee County indicated rainfall totals of 26 in. 2 mi south-southeast of Beeville and 25.7 in. 3 mi north of Skidmore.
Deaths and Damage:   Total flood damage from Hurricane Fern was an estimated $28.3 million.
Max. Precipitation:   25.70 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Bee Co., Skidmore
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1972

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10.  
Rio Grande Watershed
June 24 to 30, 1971
The rains ended a severe drought that had affected the area for several months. Reservoirs were less than one-third of conservation capacity. During the 7-day period, rainfall averaged about 9 in. on the entire watershed between Amistad Dam and Falcon Dam. El Indio in Maverick County recorded 16-18 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   18.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Maverick Co., El Indio
References:   International Boundary and Water Commission, 1971, p. 95-97

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11.  
San Marcos Vicinity
May 14 to 15, 1970
Rainfall depths to at least 18 in. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Two deaths and about 400 homes flooded in the San Marcos area.
Max. Precipitation:   18.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Hays Co., San Marcos
Caldwell Co.
References:   John Patton, National Weather Service, written commun., 1999

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12.  
Cleburne
May 6 to 7, 1969
Rainfall exceeded 8 in. during the storm. Most of this rain fell during the evening of May 6th and early morning May 7th.
Deaths and Damage:   Damage in Johnson County was estimated at $400,000.
Max. Precipitation:   8.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Johnson Co., Cleburne
References:   Reid and others, 1975

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13.  
North-Central Texas
May 4 to 10, 1969
General rains accompanied by severe thunderstorms caused floods in parts of the Sabine, Sulphur, Trinity, and Brazos River Basins within a triangular area bounded by Lubbock, Texarkana, and Waco.
Deaths and Damage:   Damage was estimated at $4.6 million in the Trinity River Basin.
Max. Precipitation:   Unknown
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Lubbock Co., Lubbock
Bowie Co., Texarkana
McLennan Co., Waco
References:   Reid and others, 1975

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14.  
Texas High Plains
August 28, 1968
Heavy rains of as much as 8 in. fell on Prairie Dog Town Fork Red River. Canyon in Randall County reported 7.87 in. All highways through Canyon were closed for a time during and immediately after the storm.
Deaths and Damage:   As a result of these heavy rains, a $2-million train wreck claimed one life 15 mi northwest of Childress.
Max. Precipitation:   7.87 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Randall Co., Canyon
References:   Rostvedt and others, 1972, p. 63-64

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15.  
Central and East Texas
June 23 to 28, 1968
During the afternoon June 23, Tropical Storm Candy moved inland over the middle Texas coast. The storm weakened slowly as it moved north toward the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Rainfall totals of 3-4 in. were common throughout central and eastern Texas, with numerous locations reporting 5 in. or more.
Deaths and Damage:   No deaths or injuries resulted from this storm; however, estimates placed crop losses at $2.1 million and property losses at $625,000.
Max. Precipitation:   5.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Dallas Co., Dallas
Tarrant Co., Fort Worth
References:   Rostvedt and others, 1972, p. 42

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16.  
South-Central Texas
January 18 to 24, 1968
During Jan. 18-21, heavy rains of 10 in. or more caused flooding from San Antonio southward to the Gulf Coast. Flooding principally was on the Guadalupe and Nueces Rivers and their tributaries.
Deaths and Damage:   Flooding in San Antonio caused five deaths and property damage estimated at $4 million.
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Bexar Co., San Antonio
References:   Rostvedt and others, 1972, p. 9

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17.  
South Texas
September 19 to 25, 1967
Rainfall produced by Hurricane Beulah caused floods of record-breaking magnitude on many streams in a 50,000 mi2 area of southern Texas and northeastern Mexico in September and October. The hurricane crossed the Texas coastline near Brownsville about daybreak Sept. 20 and dissipated in the mountains of northern Mexico Sept. 22. During Sept. 19-25, as much as 25.5 in. of rain was measured at Falls City in Karnes County. Unofficial measurements were as much as 34 in. on the Nueces River Basin. The rains produced historically significant peak discharges at several streamflow-gaging stations. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   The storm covered about 39 counties in Texas, causing 44 deaths and $145 million in damages.
Max. Precipitation:   34.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Cameron Co., Brownsville
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Schroeder and others, 1974


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18.  
Dell City Vicinity
August 21 to 23, 1966
Rain fell along a frontal system extending from Laredo to El Paso Aug. 22. More than 12 in. fell on some areas in the mountains west of Dell City. The heaviest rains were recorded during the day and night Aug. 22.
Deaths and Damage:   Several lives were lost, and total property damage in and around Dell City was estimated at $4.3 million. As much as 3 ft of water flooded 50 houses in Dell City.
Max. Precipitation:   12.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Hudspeth Co., Dell City
References:   Rostvedt and others, 1971, p. 48-50

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19.  
South-Central Texas
August 13, 1966
High-intensity rains of as much as 14 in. fell on the West Nueces, extreme upper Nueces, Dry Frio, and extreme upper Frio River Basins.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   14.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Real Co., Leakey
References:   U.S. Geological Survey, unpub. data

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20.  
Northeast Texas
April 22 to 29, 1966
The storm produced 20-26 in. of rain in parts of Wood, Smith, Harris, Upshur, Gregg, Marion, and Harrison Counties during the 8-day period Apr. 22-29. Most of the rain fell during a 72-hour period Apr. 22-25. The heaviest rains were centered over the Gilmer-Harleton area. At Gladewater, 22.74 in. fell during 60 hours.
Deaths and Damage:   At least 25 persons lost their lives in the flood. Total damage was estimated at $12 million.
Max. Precipitation:   22.74 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Upshur Co., Gilmer
References:   Rostvedt and others, 1971, p. 25-26

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21.  
North Dallas
April 28, 1966
As much as 6.7 in. fell during a 6-hour period; 4.9 in. fell during 1 hour. Almost 8 in. of rain had fallen during the preceding 2 weeks, resulting in a well-saturated basin in which all storage areas were full.
Deaths and Damage:   Flooding resulted in 14 deaths and damage estimated at $15 million.
Max. Precipitation:   6.70 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Dallas Co., Dallas
References:   Mills and Schroeder, 1969

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22.  
Navarro, Hill, Ellis, and Johnson Counties
April 20 to May 2, 1966
A series of flood-producing rains of 8-15 in. fell on Chambers Creek watershed Apr. 20-May 2. Rainfall of 7.91-14.75 in. was recorded. Unofficial reports of rainfall indicate that isolated areas of the watershed had as much as 17 in. The greatest rainfall was reported for the area immediately west of Corsicana.
Deaths and Damage:   Storm damage was estimated at $441,000.
Max. Precipitation:   17.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Navarro Co., Corsicana
References:   Soil Conservation Service, 1966a

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23.  
Gainesville Vicinity
February 8 to 9, 1966
A runoff-producing storm occurred on the Elm Fork subwatershed of the Trinity River watershed Feb. 8-9. Rainfall began about 8:00 p.m. Feb. 8 and continued until about 6:00 a.m. Feb. 9. About 6 in. fell on the Pecan Creek watershed above Gainesville during an 8-hour period.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   6.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Cooke Co., Gainesville
References:   Soil Conservation Service, 1966b

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24.  
Sanderson
June 10 to 11, 1965
Sanderson in Terrell County was struck by a 15-ft wall of water about 7:00 a.m. June 11. As much as 9 in. of rain had fallen on parts of the watershed during the 48 hours preceding the flash flood. Mean annual rainfall in the Sanderson area is about 12 in.
Deaths and Damage:   The flood drove hundreds from their homes and killed 26 people. Property damage was estimated to be about $2.7 million.
Max. Precipitation:   12.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Terrell Co., Sanderson
References:   Rostvedt and others, 1970b, p. 15


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25.  
San Antonio
May 18, 1965
Rainfall exceeding 6 in. in some areas flooded parts of San Antonio.
Deaths and Damage:   Two people drowned, and 14 were injured. Property damage was estimated at $1 million.
Max. Precipitation:   6.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Bexar Co., San Antonio
References:   Rostvedt and others, 1970b, p. 15

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26.  
Middle Brazos River Basin
May 16 to 17, 1965
The middle Brazos River Basin had rain of as much as 10 in. May 16-17, causing flooding on major tributary streams.
Deaths and Damage:   Flood damage on the Nolan and Elm Creek Basins was an estimated $1.2 million, mostly in areas near Belton and Killeen.
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Bell Co., Belton
References:   Rostvedt and others, 1970b, p. 14

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27.  
Collin, Grayson, Dallas, and Tarrant Counties
September 20 to 21, 1964
The storm began about midnight Sept. 20 and continued until about 8:00 a.m. Sept. 21. McKinney in Collin County reported 12.10 in. of rain from 1:15 to 7:00 a.m. on Sept. 21. Flooding was severe in McKinney, Fort Worth, and north Dallas.
Deaths and Damage:   Two drownings occurred, and property damage was about $3 million.
Max. Precipitation:   12.10 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Collin Co., McKinney
References:   Soil Conservation Service, 1964

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28.  
South-Central and Northeast Texas
September 15 to 30, 1964
The rain produced historically significant peak discharges at two streamflow-gaging stations. As much as 12.5 in. of rain fell during the night Sept. 15 in Dimmit County between Carrizo Springs and Encinal. As much as 15 in. fell on the Devils River Basin during 24 hours, and as much as 17 in. fell on the upper Nueces River Basin. As much as 20.33 in. was measured Sept. 15-30. During the first 8 hours of Sept. 21, more than 12 in. fell in northeastern Tarrant County, eastward over Dallas, and in Collin County. The heaviest rain fell on an area north of Dallas.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   20.33 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Dallas Co., Dallas
References:   Rostvedt and others, 1970a, p. 82-90

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29.  
Southeast Texas
September 17 to 19, 1963
Hurricane Cindy entered the Texas coast between Galveston and Port Arthur at 7:00 a.m. Sept. 17. Rainfall was 15-20 in. on the lower reaches of the Sabine and Neches Rivers. Maximum recorded rainfall was 23.5 in. at Deweyville in Newton County.
Deaths and Damage:   Two people drowned, and damage was estimated at $11.7 million.
Max. Precipitation:   23.50 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Newton Co., Deweyville
References:   Rostvedt and others, 1968b, p. 111-112

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30.  
White Rock Creek Basin
October 8, 1962
During early morning Oct. 8, an intense storm of short duration centered over Cottonwood Creek in the upper White Rock Creek Basin. An average 4.6 in. of rain fell on the basin during about 3 hours. Rainfall on Cottonwood Creek Basin ranged from about 4 in. on the upper basin to 7 in. on the lower basin.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   4.60 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Dallas Co., Dallas
References:   Rostvedt and others, 1968a, p. 99

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31.  
Haltom City near Fort Worth
September 6 to 7, 1962
As much as 11 in. of rain fell Sept. 7 on upper Big Fossil Creek Basin. During the afternoon Sept. 7, the recording rain gage near Justin, about 13 mi northeast of Big Fossil Creek Basin, measured 5 in. during 1 hour and 2 in. more the following hour.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   11.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Tarrant Co., Fort Worth
References:   Rostvedt and others, 1968a, p. 99-101

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32.  
Mineral Wells Vicinity
July 25 to 27, 1962
Heavy rain of 5-17 in. fell within a 40-mi radius of Mineral Wells July 25-27. The area upstream from Greenville Ave. in Dallas had an average rainfall of 6.2 in. July 27. That same area recorded 2 in. the previous day.
Deaths and Damage:   Property damage exceeded $1.5 million.
Max. Precipitation:   6.20 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Dallas Co., Dallas
References:   Rostvedt and others, 1968a, p. 97

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33.  
Near Crandall
July 26 to 27, 1962
A flood-producing storm began about midnight July 26 and continued intermittently until about noon July 27. Crandall recorded 11.4 in. during the 6-hour period midnight to 6:00 a.m. July 27.
Deaths and Damage:   There was no loss of life. Crop and pasture damage from the floodwaters was estimated at $26,000.
Max. Precipitation:   11.40 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Kaufman Co., Crandall
References:   Soil Conservation Service, 1962

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34.  
Gulf Coast
September 10 to 12, 1961
The eye of Hurricane Carla crossed the Texas coastline at 3:00 p.m. Sept. 11. Relatively low-intensity rain fell the entire 3-day period. Storm rainfall was 15.32 in. at Galveston, and 11.66 in. at Conroe.
Deaths and Damage:   At least 32 people lost their lives. Damage from this destructive storm was an estimated $408 million.
Max. Precipitation:   15.32 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Galveston Co., Galveston
References:   U.S. Geological Survey, unpub. data

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35.  
Fort Worth Vicinity
June 24 to 25, 1961
A small-area storm of high intensity caused flash flooding in Richland Hills near Fort Worth. Three rain gages in the area recorded rainfalls of 3.64-4.71 in. A bucket survey was conducted on upper Big Fossil Creek where 7.7, 8.0, and 8.7 in. of rain were recorded.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   8.70 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Tarrant Co., Fort Worth
References:   Rostvedt, 1965b, p. 57

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36.  
Austin Vicinity
June 17 to 18, 1961
Flash flooding in Austin during the night June 17-18 resulted from intense rainfall. The greatest recorded rainfall was 6.86 in.
Deaths and Damage:   About 300 people were evacuated from their homes in southeast Austin when Boggy Creek overflowed its banks.
Max. Precipitation:   6.86 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Travis Co., Austin
References:   U.S. Geological Survey

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37.  
Starr and Jim Hogg Counties
October 23 to 24, 1960
Heavy rain produced a severe flood in the lower reaches of Los Olmos Creek, reportedly one of the largest on record. Rainfall began at 7:00 p.m. Oct. 23 and lasted about 12 hours. The heaviest rainfall was during the last 6 hours of the storm. Rainfalls exceeding 8 in. were reported. Heavy damage occurred in Rio Grande City. Overflow from Los Olmos Creek flooded 53 city blocks, left about 2,000 of the approximately 6,000 people in the city homeless.
Deaths and Damage:   There was no loss of life. Damage was estimated at more than $1 million.
Max. Precipitation:   8.00 in. (Starr Co.)
8.00 in. (Jim Hogg Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Starr Co., Santa Elena
Jim Hogg Co., Hebbronville
References:   Rostvedt, 1965a, p. 131-133

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38.  
South and South-Central Texas
October 16 to 30, 1960
Heavy rain averaging 7-10 in. during the night Oct. 28-29 in south-central Texas caused flash floods on many small streams. Depths of as much as 19 in. were reported. Refugio recorded 13.38 in. of rainfall Oct. 16. High-intensity rains Oct. 16-17 averaged 6-8 in.; more than 15 in. of rain fell in some areas. Rainfall began again at 7 p.m. Oct. 23 and lasted about 12 hours.
Deaths and Damage:   Floodwaters killed 13 people, and property damage was estimated at more than $6 million.
Max. Precipitation:   13.38 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Refugio Co., Refugio
References:   Rostvedt, 1965a, p. 131-137

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39.  
Southern High Plains
July 5 to 8, 1960
Rainfall was excessive in the Lubbock, Plainview, Levelland, Littlefield, and Slaton area of the southern High Plains. Unofficial 1-hour rainfall intensities were reported to be as much as 4.5-5 in. southeast of Lubbock. Other unofficial reports gave rainfall depths of 12-14 in. near Lubbock during a 48-hour period July 5-7. In southwestern Lamb County, as much as 8.6 in. fell 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. July 7.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   14.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Lubbock Co., Lubbock
References:   U.S. Geological Survey, unpub. data

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40.  
Gulf Coast
June 24 to 26, 1960
A tropical storm moving inland caused general rain of 8 in. or more on about 20,000 mi2. Rainfall totals of more than 30 in. were recorded at Port Lavaca during the period June 24-26.
Deaths and Damage:   Eight people drowned, and damage was estimated at $3.5 million.
Max. Precipitation:   30.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Calhoun Co., Port Lavaca
References:   Rostvedt, 1965a, p. 92-95

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41.  
Central High Plains
June 5 to 12, 1960
Heavy rain produced localized flooding in the Amarillo area and eastern Panhandle. The Amarillo Municipal Airport recorded 6.15 in. during 24 hours June 9-10.
Deaths and Damage:   Because of heavy flooding, Hall County was declared a disaster area.
Max. Precipitation:   6.15 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Potter Co., Amarillo Municipal Airport
Randall Co.
References:   U.S. Geological Survey, unpub. data

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42.  
Trinity, Brazos, Colorado, Guadalupe, Nueces River Basins
September 28 to October 4, 1959
As much as 12 in. of rain caused extensive flooding in the upper Trinity River Basin on Big Fossil, Big Sandy, Chambers, and Richland Creeks and produced historically significant peak discharges at several streamflow-gaging stations. In the middle Brazos River Basin, floods (exceeding all previously known) on North Bosque River and Cowhouse Creek followed rain totaling more than 14 in. at some places. Spring Creek in the middle Colorado River Basin reached its highest stage since 1882 following rainfall that exceeded 10 in. Johnson Creek, in the headwaters of the Guadalupe River, recorded the second highest flood known since at least 1852. Flash flooding on the upper Nueces River Basin followed heavy rain Oct. 3-4. Unofficial totals of as much as 16 in. of rain were reported.
Deaths and Damage:   One person drowned during the flood. Big Fossil Creek flooded parts of Richland Hills, a suburb of Fort Worth, causing an estimated $300,000 in damage. Damage to agricultural interests and rural public properties was estimated at $700,000 by the U.S. Weather Bureau.
Max. Precipitation:   16.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Tarrant Co., Fort Worth
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Hendricks, 1964b, p. 70-74

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43.  
Cherokee Bayou
May 2 to 3, 1959
Heavy rain May 2-3 covered all of Cherokee Bayou Basin, a tributary to the Sabine River. The rainfall lasted 4-6 hours with official totals of as much as 11 in. Bucket surveys indicated rainfall amounts of as much as 13.8 in. The heaviest rainfall was on the part of the watershed upstream of the dam that forms Lake Cherokee.
Deaths and Damage:   Severe flooding caused three deaths, and damage was estimated at slightly more than $1 million.
Max. Precipitation:   13.80 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Gregg Co., Cherokee Bayou
Rusk Co.
References:   Hendricks, 1964b, p. 41-42

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44.  
Southwest Texas
June 16 to 18, 1958
Flooding in the Devils River Basin in the headwaters of the Nueces and Guadalupe Rivers and in certain tributaries to the Colorado River above Lake Travis produced peak discharges at several streamflow-gaging stations. The heaviest rainfall amounts reported were 6-10 in.; however, there were a few unofficial reports of 16-20 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Travis Co., Lake Travis
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Hendricks, 1963b, p. 52-53

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45.  
Texas and Louisiana
April 24 to 27, 1958
The storm covered an east-west belt about 50-mi wide extending from Mt. Pleasant, Tex., eastward to the Mississippi River. U.S. Weather Bureau records show that the greatest amount of rainfall in Texas during the 3-day period was 10.02 in. at Daingerfield in Morris County and 8.31 in. at Linden in Cass County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   10.02 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Morris Co., Daingerfield
References:   Smith, 1964, p. 4-7

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46.  
South-Central Texas
February 20 to 22, 1958
Heavy rains Feb. 20-22 caused major flooding on many small streams in central and South Texas. In the Brazos River Basin, as much as 6 in. of rain caused flash flooding on Brushy Creek and the Lampasas and San Gabriel Rivers. In the Colorado River Basin, flooding generally was confined to the narrow part of the basin downstream of Austin. Major flooding also occurred in the Guadalupe River Basin downstream of New Braunfels. Victoria was the only city in the Guadalupe River watershed to experience any serious flooding. About 26 blocks of the city were flooded requiring the evacuation of about 350 people. In the Nueces watershed, flash flooding occurred in the upper basin. Major flooding occurred in the Nueces River watershed and its tributaries below Cotulla in La Salle County.
Deaths and Damage:   Flooding from the storm caused two deaths on the Guadalupe River, and damage exceeded $1 million.
Max. Precipitation:   Unknown
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Hays Co.
Caldwell Co.
La Salle Co.
References:   Hendricks, 1963b, p. 13-14

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47.  
West-Central Texas
October 12 to 15, 1957
Heavy showers and thunderstorms Oct. 12-15 in west-central Texas caused excessive flooding primarily on streams in the upper Colorado River Basin upstream of Winchell. Several U.S. Weather Bureau observers in the area reported more than 8 in. during the storm. Robert Lee, near the center of the affected area, recorded 8.4 in. during the 24 hours ending 6:00 a.m. Oct. 13.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   8.40 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Coke Co., Robert Lee
References:   Hendricks, 1963a, p. 85

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48.  
Texas and Adjacent States
April to June 1957
Total rainfall on much of the eastern two-thirds of Texas for the 3-month period exceeded that normally recorded for a 12-month period. These rains effectively broke the infamous 1950s drought. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   19.32 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Palo Pinto Co., Brazos
References:   Yost, 1963, p. 5-9


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49.  
Mukewater Creek Watershed
April 29 to May 1, 1956
Rainfall began about 8:00 a.m. Apr. 29 and continued, with varying intensity, for 30 hours. A gage in the upper end of the watershed recorded 8.3 in. during 2.5 hours and 3.1 in. during 30 minutes. This gage recorded 10.09 in. of rain during the storm.
Deaths and Damage:   There was no loss of life. Damage was estimated at $160,000.
Max. Precipitation:   10.09 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Coleman Co.
Brown Co.
References:   Soil Conservation Service, 1956b

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50.  
Green Creek Watershed
April 29 to May 3, 1956
Maximum recorded precipitation was 14.54 in. in the upper North Bosque River Basin. In Erath County 3 mi northeast of Stephenville, 11.57 in. was measured during the period, with a maximum intensity of 3 in. during 45 minutes Apr. 30. As much as 8 in. of rain was reported in that area during 2.5 hours Apr. 30.
Deaths and Damage:   There was no loss of life. Damage was estimated at $80,000.
Max. Precipitation:   14.54 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Erath Co., Stephenville
References:   Hendricks, 1964a, p. 26-28; Soil Conservation Service, 1956a

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51.  
Upper Brazos River Basin
September 24 to 25, 1955
Most of the rain fell in less than 24 hours. The storm was widespread, but small areas had heavy rainfall with depths of 10-15 in. The heaviest rainfall recorded was 15 in. west of Justiceburg.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Garza Co., Justiceberg
References:   Wells, 1962, p. 127-129

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52.  
Val Verde and Adjacent Counties
September 23 to 25, 1955
Rain in large amounts and of severe intensity fell Sept. 23-25 on extreme upper ends of the Nueces and South Llano River Basins and eastern Devils River Basin. A 10-in. rainfall center occurred on the West Nueces River northeast of Brackettville and west of Laguna. A 15-in. center occurred on the Dry Devils River north of Carta Valley and west of Rocksprings. A 24-in. center occurred on the Nueces River near the mouth of Hackberry Creek southeast of Rocksprings. Most of the rain fell during the night Sept. 23 and morning Sept. 24.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   24.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Edwards Co., Rocksprings
References:   Wells, 1962, p. 123-127

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53.  
Pecos River Basin
September 22 to 27 and October 2 to 4, 1955
The rain-gage coverage of the area was poor, and no rainfall records are available in the Delaware River or Salt Draw Basins, where the greatest amounts of rain caused record-breaking floods Oct. 2. No bucket surveys were conducted in the area most greatly affected.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   10.40 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Yoakum Co., Plains
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Wells, 1962, p. 129-131

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54.  
Bosque River Watershed
May 18 to 19, 1955
Rainfall began about 7:30 p.m. May 18 and continued for 5.5 hours. A gage 9 mi west of Stephenville in the Green Creek watershed recorded 2.00 in. during one 30-minute period. Bucket surveys indicated that higher intensities were near the center of the storm. Maximum recorded rainfall was 12.0 in. 5 mi east of Lingleville.
Deaths and Damage:   Damage was estimated at $680,000.
Max. Precipitation:   12.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Erath Co., Lingleville
References:   Soil Conservation Service, 1955b

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55.  
Deep Creek Watershed
May 17 to 19, 1955
Rainfall began about 7:00 p.m. May 17 and continued for 30 hours. Maximum recorded rainfall was 9.22 in. about 7 mi southeast of Mercury in McCulloch County. A depth of 0.80 in. was recorded for one 5-minute period.
Deaths and Damage:   There was no loss of life from the storm. An estimated $14,580 damage was caused by the storm.
Max. Precipitation:   9.22 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   McCulloch Co., Mercury
References:   Soil Conservation Service, 1955a

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56.  
Lower Rio Grande Basin
June 24 to 29, 1954
Hurricane Alice moved inland from the Gulf of Mexico June 24. The heaviest rainfall recorded was on the Pecos River below Sheffield and its tributary, Howards Creek. On Johnson Draw (a tributary of the Devils River), a large part of the town of Ozona was severely flooded, and several people drowned. As much as 34 in. of rain was observed at two centers 22 and 40 mi north of Langtry. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   An unknown number of lives were lost in the floodwaters, particularly at Piedras Negras, Mexico, opposite Eagle Pass, Tex.
Max. Precipitation:   34.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Val Verde Co., Langtry
References:   International Boundary and Water Commission, 1954, p. 56-57; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data; Wells, 1959d, p. 228-229


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57.  
Bull Creek Basin
April 10 to 13, 1954
Rainfall on Bull Creek in Borden County was as much as 5.1 in. Apr. 10-13.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   5.10 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Borden Co., Bull Creek Basin
References:   McDaniels, 1954, p. 1-2

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58.  
Upper Colorado River Basin
August 19, 1953
On Aug. 19, a flash flood occurred on the upper Colorado River, where as much as 10 in. of rain was reported.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Runnels Co., Ballinger
References:   Wells, 1959c, p. 341-364

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59.  
Salt, Paint, and Pecan Creek Watersheds
July 15, 1953
The storm covered a 75-mi2 area near Edith in Coke County. Maximum recorded rainfall was 5 in.
Deaths and Damage:   There was no loss of life and damage was estimated at $32,000.
Max. Precipitation:   5.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Coke Co., Edith
References:   Soil Conservation Service, 1953b

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60.  
Tehuacana Creek Watershed
May 11 to 12, 1953
Rainfall began about 4:00 p.m. May 11 and continued for about 24 hours. The greatest rainfall for the 2-day period, 9.30 in., was recorded about 4 mi south of Leroy in McLennan County.
Deaths and Damage:   Damage to the watershed exceeded $1 million.
Max. Precipitation:   9.30 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   McLennan Co., Leroy
References:   Soil Conservation Service, 1953c

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61.  
Richland Creek Watershed
May 11 to 15, 1953
The heaviest rainfall fell in southwestern Hill County near Hubbard, Malone, and Penelope. About 14 in. was recorded for the 5-day period in the vicinity of these towns, with about 70 percent of the rainfall May 11-12.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   14.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Hill Co., Hubbard
References:   Soil Conservation Service, 1953a

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62.  
Sabine and Neches River Basins
April 27 to May 20, 1953
Major flooding resulted from heavy rain in the Sabine and Neches River Basins during the last few days of April and continued until May 20. At Bon Wier on the Sabine River, April rainfall totaled 11.05 in., with 8 in. Apr. 29. Rainfall totaled 20.44 in. May 1-19; 8.65 in. May 18; and 15.6 in. during the 7-day period May 13-19.
Deaths and Damage:   Flood damage in the two basins was about $2.7 million.
Max. Precipitation:   20.44 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Newton Co., Bon Weir
References:   Wells, 1959a, p. 167-169

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63.  
Guadalupe and Lower Colorado River Basins
September 9 to 11, 1952
Two to 26 in. of rain fell on a 25,000-mi2 area that formed a 100-mi-wide belt extending from Corpus Christi northwestward for 250 mi. Storm totals of 20-26 in. were concentrated in a small area in Blanco and Kendall Counties. Hye in Blanco County recorded 23.55 in. during 48 hours, with 20.70 in. during one 24-hour period. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Floods killed five people and caused an estimated $17 million in damage.
Max. Precipitation:   26.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Blanco Co., Hye
References:   Breeding and Montgomery 1954, p. 2-11; Orton, 1966, p. 1-17; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data


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64.  
North-Central Texas
May 23, 1952
Heavy rain fell in eastern Comanche, central Erath, and western Hood Counties 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. May 23. Maximum recorded rainfall was 20 in. 5.5 mi east of De Leon in Comanche County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   20.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Comanche Co., DeLeon
References:   Wells, 1959b, p. 699

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65.  
Coastal Plain
September 12 to 16, 1951
Rain of 5-21 in. fell on an area greater than 26,000 mi2, including all of Texas south of latitude 29° and east of longitude 99°. From 7:00 to 10:00 a.m. Sept. 13, 7.65 in. was measured.
Deaths and Damage:   Floods caused an estimated $1.5 million in damage, and 1,300 people were evacuated.
Max. Precipitation:   16.30 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Jim Wells Co., Alice
References:   Wells, 1957, p. 288; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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66.  
Edwards Plateau
May 15, 1951
Maximum recorded rainfall of 19 in. occurred at Sabinal in Uvalde County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   19.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Uvalde Co., Sabinal
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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67.  
Northwest Texas
May 13 to 19, 1951
Heavy thunderstorms May 13-19 produced floods of unusual magnitude on a wide area in western Oklahoma and northwestern Texas. In Texas, Palo Duro Creek Basin, a tributary of Prairie Dog Town Fork Red River northwest of Hereford, had 11 in. of rain. The maximum recorded rainfall was 15 in. at Conway, east of Amarillo.
Deaths and Damage:   Five persons lost their lives in flood waters, and estimated damage exceeded $2 million.
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Potter Co., Conway
Randall Co.
References:   Wells, 1954

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