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  Texas Storms, 1950-1926 Storms
52 storms: sorted by date. Select Dates From Timeline
 
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1.  
Wichita Falls
August 1, 1950
Heavy rainfall began about 1:00 a.m. Aug. 1. Reports indicate the heaviest rain fell 1:00 to 6:00 a.m. Southwest of Wichita Falls, 4-10 in. were recorded. Maximum recorded rainfall was 9.75 in. during 24 hours 6.5 mi southeast of Dundee.
Deaths and Damage:   Damage in Wichita Falls was estimated at $1 million.
Max. Precipitation:   9.75 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Archer Co., Dundee
References:   Yost, 1951


USGS_74

2.  
East Texas
October 3 to 4, 1949
A hurricane entered the Texas coast near Freeport during the night Oct. 3. Rainfall was heavy along the Texas-Louisiana coast ahead and east of the hurricane as it moved inland. Rainfall amounts and intensities decreased rapidly as the disturbance passed through the area and weakened. Maximum recorded rainfall was 11.3 in. at Beaumont in Jefferson County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   11.30 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Jefferson Co., Beaumont
References:   Schoner and Molansky, 1956

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3.  
North-Central Texas
June 13 to 14, 1949
From 2 to 10 in. of rain fell in the upper Trinity River Basin on the 13th and 14th centered near Richardson, Garland, and Carrollton. Most of the rain fell during the night. Streets in Carrollton were reported knee deep in water, and all highways leading north of Dallas were blocked by floodwaters at 12:30 a.m. on the 14th.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Dallas Co., Richardson
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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4.  
Fort Worth
May 17, 1949
Maximum recorded rainfall was 12 in. on Village Creek in the West Fork Trinity River Basin southeast of Fort Worth.
Deaths and Damage:   Ten lives were lost, and damage was $15 million in Fort Worth and vicinity.
Max. Precipitation:   12.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Tarrant Co., Fort Worth
References:   Breeding, 1949


USGS_76

5.  
North-Central Texas
May 16 to 17, 1949
Excessive rain ranging from 2 to 10 in. in the upper Trinity River Basin on May 16th and 17th produced the flood of record in Fort Worth with extensive flooding of business and residential areas and leaving residents without city water for about 3 days. Dallas had the second highest flood of record with severe flooding along lowlands outside of the levee district, and several sections of south Dallas, unprotected by levees. The same excessive precipitation that caused the Fort Worth-Dallas flood also caused moderate flooding along the Brazos River from Granbury to Waco on the 17th and extended into the Sulphur and Sabine River Basins.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   12.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Tarrant Co., Kennedale
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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6.  
Rio Grande Watershed
September 8 to 11, 1948
Rain fell on the entire lower Rio Grande Valley below Eagle Pass and on most of the Mexican tributary streams that flow into the lower Rio Grande. Scattered rainfall of as much as 8 in. was recorded for the basin above Zapata and below Del Rio. The storm began about noon Sept. 8 and was more or less continuous until the end of the storm Sept. 11. The heaviest and most concentrated rainfall was at rain gages on the U.S. side of the Rio Grande 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Sept. 10.
Deaths and Damage:   Total flood damage was estimated at $5.68 million.
Max. Precipitation:   8.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Maverick Co., Eagle Pass
Hidalgo Co.
Cameron Co.
References:   International Boundary and Water Commission, 1949, p. 65-71

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7.  
Rio Grande Watershed
July 1 to 4, 1948
Scattered rain fell July 1-3 on the Rio Grande watershed with heavy rain beginning early morning July 4. The storm was localized and centered over San Felipe Creek northeast of Del Rio and over the Devils River in the vicinity of Juno. The maximum recorded rainfall of 10 in. was measured in a garbage can about 8 mi east of Del Rio.
Deaths and Damage:   Flood damage was estimated at $325,500.
Max. Precipitation:   10.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Val Verde Co., Del Rio
References:   International Boundary and Water Commission, 1949, p. 52-56


USGS_71

8.  
Rio Grande Watershed
June 23 to 24, 1948
Intense storms were centered along the divide between the Devils River and the tributaries lying immediately to the east June 23-24. The rain began during the morning June 23 and continued into the next day, with the most intense rain early morning June 24. The storm had three separate storm centers, each receiving 24 in. or more rain in less than 24 hours. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Total flood damage was estimated at $3.6 million.
Max. Precipitation:   24.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Val Verde Co.
Kinney Co.
Edwards Co.
References:   International Boundary and Water Commission, 1949, p. 4-18


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USGS_56



USGS_61

NWS_4

9.  
San Antonio
September 26 to 27, 1946
Heavy rainfall was recorded for the 2-day period. The center of the storm extended from southern San Antonio south and southeast about 20 mi. More than 16 in. of rain fell on this 110-mi2 area, with 6.61 in. recorded 8:00 p.m. Sept. 26 to 4:00 a.m. Sept. 27. San Antonio Municipal Airport recorded 6.93 in., with 6.61 in. 8:00 p.m. to 4:00 a.m.
Deaths and Damage:   The flood spawned by the storm resulted in the loss of several lives and much property damage around San Antonio.
Max. Precipitation:   16.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Bexar Co., San Antonio
References:   Breeding, 1947, 1948a; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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10.  
Gulf Coast
August 26 to 29, 1945
The tropical disturbance produced heavy rains on the Texas coast. The extremely slow movement of the tropical disturbance produced heavy rainfall. Maximum recorded storm rainfall was 19.6 in. at Hockley in Harris County 7:00 a.m. Aug. 26 to 1:00 p.m. Aug. 29.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   19.60 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Hockley
References:   Schoner and Molansky, 1956; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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11.  
Reeves County
July 1 to 3, 1945
Rainfall for a 48-hour period beginning about 10:00 a.m. July 1 was 2.5-13.1 in. The greatest amount was recorded at Kingston Farm, about 2.7 mi west of Toyahvale, and at Kountze Ranch, about 6 mi southeast of Toyahvale. The storm centered in the immediate vicinity of Phantom Lake Spring, about 3.5 mi southwest of Toyahvale. A band of extremely heavy rainfall about 8 mi wide extended southeast about 12-14 mi and northwest 10-12 mi.
Deaths and Damage:   The storm caused damage estimated at $52,000.
Max. Precipitation:   13.10 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Reeves Co., Kingston Farm
References:   U.S. Geological Survey, unpub. data

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12.  
North-Central Texas
March 28 to April 2, 1945
The largest amounts of rainfall occurred in Dallas, Upshur, Henderson, and Van Zandt Counties. Over 8 in. of rain fell in Henderson County with almost half coming on March 30.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   8.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Henderson Co., Athens
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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13.  
Central and East Texas
April 29 to May 5, 1944
This large storm covered much of Central and East Texas with rainfall depths up to 15 in. The largest depths occurred in the areas of Jackson Hill, Gary, Beaumont, Waco, Lake End, and Whitecliffs.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   15.91 in. (Sabine Co.)
15.70 in. (Sabine Co.)
15.68 in. (Panola Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Sabine Co., Jackson Hill
Sabine Co., Bronson
Panola Co., Gary
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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14.  
Upper Gulf Coast
July 27 to 29, 1943
A hurricane entered the Galveston Bay area about noon July 27, moved inland over Galveston Bay, passed over Houston shortly after midnight, and continued on toward Navasota with a rapid decrease in intensity. Maximum recorded storm rainfall was 23.0 in. at Devers in Liberty County 1:00 p.m. July 27 to 1:00 a.m. July 29.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   23.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Liberty Co., Devers
References:   Schoner and Molansky, 1956; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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15.  
Upper Sabine River Watershed
June 6 to 7, 1943
Heavy rains that fell on the upper Sabine River watershed June 6 caused the highest stages known at that time for the Sabine River. Kaufman in Kaufman County reported 9.18 in. of rainfall for the week ending June 8. Unofficial rainfall reports from Grand Saline in Van Zandt County indicated more than 13 in. of rainfall June 6.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   13.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Van Zandt Co., Grand Saline
References:   U.S. Geological Survey, unpub. data

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16.  
South Texas
August 28 to 30, 1942
A hurricane moved inland over the Matagorda Bay area during the morning Aug. 30 and dissipated in the highland regions of southern Texas by evening Aug. 30. Maximum recorded rainfall was 9.3 in. at Woodsboro in Refugio County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   9.30 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Refugio Co., Woodsboro
References:   Schoner and Molansky, 1956

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17.  
Southeast Texas
July 2 to 6, 1942
Rainfall of 10-14 in. along the entire Gulf coast caused flooding throughout much of southeast Texas.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   13.00 in. (Navarro Co.)
12.90 in. (Guadalupe Co.)
12.10 in. (Victoria Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Navarro Co., Eureka
Guadalupe Co., Seguin
Victoria Co., Victoria Air Base
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1954

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18.  
White Rock Creek in Dallas
April 19 to 20, 1942
According to long-time area residents, this was the greatest flood since at least 1886. The rain produced historically significant peak discharges at several streamflow-gaging stations. Although official rainfall stations adjacent to the watershed did not receive extraordinary rainfall, there were unofficial reports of as much as 12 in. on the upper watershed. Two days of general thunderstorm activity in the area prior to this storm contributed to a higher-than-normal rate of flood runoff.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   12.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Dallas Co., Dallas
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Gilbert, 1963

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19.  
North-Central Texas
April 5 to 30, 1942
The largest amounts of rainfall occurred in Tarrant and Cooke Counties. Tarrant County had nearly 17 in. of rain while Cooke County had about 16.5 in. The highest daily total, 5.7 in., occurred in Cooke County on the 25th.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   17.00 in. (Tarrant Co.)
16.50 in. (Cooke Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Tarrant Co., Ft. Worth
Cooke Co., Gainesville
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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20.  
Upper Gulf Coast
September 15 to 17, 1941
A weak tropical disturbance entered Texas during the night of Sept. 14. Rainfall was light as the disturbance moved inland; however, moderate showers began over the coast of southeastern Texas Sept. 16 and spread westward to south-central Texas Sept. 17. Maximum recorded rainfall was 10.2 in. at Karnes City in Karnes County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   10.20 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Karnes Co., Karnes City
References:   Schoner and Molansky, 1956

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21.  
San Jacinto River Basin
November 21 to 26, 1940
The heaviest rainfall recorded in the San Jacinto River Basin was 17.46 in. at Montgomery Nov. 21-25, with 14 in. 2:00 p.m. Nov. 23 to 2:00 p.m. Nov. 24. Shepherd in San Jacinto County recorded 19.68 in. Nov. 21-25, with 16 in. 2:00 p.m. Nov. 23 to 2:00 p.m. Nov. 24.
Deaths and Damage:   Highways and railways were damaged greatly, and livestock worth many thousands of dollars drowned.
Max. Precipitation:   19.68 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   San Jacinto Co., Shepherd
References:   Breeding, 1948b, p. 62-69; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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22.  
South-Central Texas
June 28 to 30, 1940
Maximum recorded rainfall at Engle in Fayette County was 22.7 in. during the 2-day period June 29-30, with 17.5 in. 8:00 p.m. June 29 to 8:00 a.m. June 30. The heaviest 2-day rainfall at Smithville in Bastrop County was 20.40 in. June 29-30, with 16 in. 7:00 p.m. June 29 to 10:00 a.m. June 30. This record rainfall caused destructive floods along lower parts of the Colorado and Guadalupe Rivers and along upper parts of the Lavaca River and its creek tributaries.
Deaths and Damage:   Two people drowned on the Colorado River, and seven lives were lost on the Lavaca River at Hallettsville. Property and crop losses were estimated at more than $1 million.
Max. Precipitation:   22.70 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Fayette Co.
References:   Breeding, 1948b, p. 1-7; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data


USGS_22



USGS_26

23.  
Scurry and Adjacent Counties
June 19 to 20, 1939
Rainfall of 4-19 in. fell during 4-10 hours on an area of about 1,000 mi2 near Snyder in Scurry County.
Deaths and Damage:   The resulting flood on the Colorado River and its tributaries caused one death and damage was estimated at $350,000.
Max. Precipitation:   19.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Scurry Co., Snyder
References:   Breeding and Dalrymple, 1944, p. 104-105

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24.  
South Texas
August 27 to 29, 1938
A tropical disturbance entered the Gulf Coast about 200 mi south of Brownsville the morning of Aug. 28. Maximum recorded rainfall was 6.5 in. at Sarita in Kenedy County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   6.50 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Kenedy Co., Sarita
References:   Schoner and Molansky, 1956

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25.  
Middle Colorado River Basin
July 16 to 25, 1938
Floods were caused by heavy rains that centered over the San Saba River, South Concho River, and Brady Creek watersheds. Maximum recorded rainfall was 13 in. July 23 at two places, 8 and 10 mi north of Eldorado in Schleicher County. Eldorado recorded 30 in. July 16-25. About 70 locations had 20 in. or more. Parts of 12 counties were inundated. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Six people were reported drowned, and property and crop losses were estimated at $5 million.
Max. Precipitation:   13.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Schleicher Co., Eldorado
References:   Breeding and Dalrymple, 1944, p. 23-38


USGS_19



USGS_28



USGS_29

USGS_32



USGS_33

26.  
Panhandle
June 15, 1938
The rains produced peak discharges in Lake Creek Basin in Donley County, where flooding greater than any known before occurred. Maximum recorded rainfall was 14 in. 9:00 to 11:30 p.m. June 15.
Deaths and Damage:   Flooding resulted in five deaths and thousands of dollars in damage.
Max. Precipitation:   14.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Donley Co., Lake Creek Basin
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Breeding and Dalrymple, 1944, p. 18-21

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27.  
East Texas
January 20 to 25, 1938
A maximum recorded depth of 10.73 in. of rain fell at Naples in Morris County. Floods greater than any known before occurred on the Sulphur River. Large but not record-breaking floods also occurred on Cypress Creek and the upper Sabine River.
Deaths and Damage:   Damage was estimated at $47,650.
Max. Precipitation:   10.73 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Morris Co., Naples
References:   Breeding and Dalrymple, 1944, p. 6-9

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28.  
East Texas
November 8 to 10, 1937
The largest amounts of rainfall occurred in Henderson, Anderson, and Rusk Counties. 6.3 in. fell in a 24-hour period in Marshall County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   7.16 in. (Anderson Co.)
7.06 in. (Harrison Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Anderson Co., Long Lake
Harrison Co., Marshall
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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29.  
Most of Texas
September 25 to 28, 1936
The most intense rain was 15 in. near Kaufman in the Trinity River Basin. Heavy rain of 6-15 in. fell on a relatively small area of the Brazos River watershed upstream of Waco. The greatest amount, 15 in., fell at Hillsboro in Hill County. Rain of 6-10 in. fell on a small area of the Colorado River Basin between Marble Falls and Burnet in Burnet County. The rain caused Hamilton Creek to rise higher than at any other time since 1884. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Hill Co., Hillsboro
References:   Dalrymple and others, 1937, p. 52-67


NWS_3

30.  
Most of Texas
September 19 to 24, 1936
A maximum depth of 7.65 in. was recorded on a small area around Weatherford. Rain also fell on a wide area of the extreme upper Brazos River Basin. Maximum recorded rainfall was 9.39 in. at Tahoka. Lubbock recorded 8.32 in. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   9.39 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Lubbock Co., Tahoka
References:   Dalrymple and others, 1937, p. 52-68

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31.  
Sterling County
September 16 to 17, 1936
The storm was centered over Broome in Sterling County. Broome recorded 23.5 in. during the 18-hour period 9:00 p.m. Sept. 16 to 3:00 p.m. Sept. 17. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   23.50 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Sterling Co., Broome
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data


USGS_63

32.  
Colorado River Basin
September 13 to 18, 1936
Sandy and Walnut Creeks in the Colorado River Basin reached the highest stages known at the time. Rainfall exceeded 30 in. Sept. 13-18 at some locations in a large part of the Concho River Basin. In the vicinity of Fort McKavett in Menard County, more than 10 in. of rain fell Sept. 13-16. At the headwaters of Terrett Draw, about 10 mi south of Fort McKavett, 21-25 in. fell noon Sept. 15 to noon Sept. 16. A very heavy rain of 8-30 in., with 14 in. during about 2.5 hours at one location, fell on the North Llano River Basin Sept. 13-16. The maximum storm rainfall of 30.0 in. was recorded at Broome in Sterling County from 1:00 a.m. Sept. 15 to 7:00 p.m. Sept. 17. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   San Angelo in Tom Green County had extensive damage—about 300 buildings were washed away. Much of the business district and 500 homes in San Angelo were flooded.
Max. Precipitation:   30.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Sterling Co., Broome
References:   Dalrymple and others, 1937, p. 52-67; Schoner and Molansky, 1956


USGS_65


USGS_69

33.  
Texas
June 30 to July 4, 1936
Rain fell June 30-July 4 on parts of the Rio Grande Basin and the Nueces, Guadalupe, Colorado, and Neches River Basins. The rain produced large peak discharges at several streamflow-gaging stations. Heavy rain, amounting to 17 in., was recorded at Eagle Pass in the Rio Grande Basin. Rainfall of more than 10 in. was recorded in the Neches River Basin at Rockland in Tyler County. The heaviest recorded rainfall was in central Guadalupe River Basin. Maximum recorded storm rainfall was 21.0 in. at Bebe in Gonzales County 1:00 a.m. June 30 to 1:00 p.m. July 1.
Deaths and Damage:   Severe flooding in central Guadalupe River Basin caused 26 deaths and estimated property damage of more than $2 million.
Max. Precipitation:   21.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Gonzales Co., Bebe
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Dalrymple and others, 1937, p. 21-41; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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34.  
South-Central and East Texas
May 22 to 28, 1936
The storm began at 7:00 a.m. May 22 on the Gulf Coast. Maximum recorded storm rainfall was 14.9 in. at La Grange in Fayette County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   14.90 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Fayette Co., La Grange
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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35.  
Harris County
December 6 to 8, 1935
Torrential rains in Harris County Dec. 6-8 caused large rises in Buffalo and Whiteoak Bayous. Houston reported 5.52 in., and Satsuma in northwestern Harris County reported 16.49 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Eight people drowned in the flooding, and property damage was estimated at $ 2.5 million.
Max. Precipitation:   16.49 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Satsuma
References:   Dalrymple and others, 1939, p. 276-280; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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36.  
South-Central Texas
September 2 to 7, 1935
Rainfall depths up to 12 in. in Ballinger caused flooding in south-central Texas.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   12.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Runnels Co., Ballinger
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1954

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37.  
Central Texas
June 10 to 15, 1935
Heavy rain over the Colorado and Nueces River Basins caused flooding greater than any known before. The Llano and West Nueces Rivers experienced extraordinary floods. There were few official rain gages in the area, but unofficial records were compiled from many sources. Heavy rain of 4-12 in. fell during 24 hours. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   No loss of life was reported. Flooding caused damage of $20 million.
Max. Precipitation:   18.30 in. (Kimble Co.)
17.60 in. (Edwards Co.)
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Kimble Co., Segovia
Edwards Co., Carta Valley
References:   Dalrymple and others, 1939, p. 236-240; Asquith and Slade, 1995


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38.  
Seco Creek Basin
May 31, 1935
Heavy rainfall over the Seco Creek Basin above D'Hanis in early morning May 31 caused the creek to rise rapidly and reach the highest historical stage for D'Hanis. There were no rain gages in the basin during the storm, and receptacles ordinarily used for measuring rainfall ran over or were washed away. Bucket surveys estimated that 22-24 in. of rain fell over a small area, and that 12-14 in. fell at other points during 3 hours or less. The National Weather Service reports that a maximum of 22 in. of rain fell in 2 hours and 45 minutes. An average amount of more than 9 in. fell on the entire 80-mi2 watershed. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Four children and one woman drowned. Damage to railroad and highways was estimated at $48,500.
Max. Precipitation:   24.00 in.
22.00 in. (Medina Co.)
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Medina Co., D'Hanis
References:   Dalrymple and others, 1939, p. 232-236


USGS_18

39.  
South Texas
September 4 to 6, 1933
A hurricane moved across the Gulf and struck the southern Texas coast during the night Sept. 4. Rainfall was heavy immediately ahead and east of the hurricane as it moved inland over southern Texas during the night Sept. 4 and early morning Sept. 5. Maximum recorded storm rainfall was 15.0 in. at Mercedes in Hidalgo County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Hidalgo Co., Mercedes
References:   Schoner and Molansky, 1956

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40.  
East Texas
July 22 to 27, 1933
A weak tropical disturbance moved inland over the Texas coast and then interacted with a cold front during the night of July 23. The maximum storm rainfall of 21.3 in. was recorded at Logansport, La., 7:00 a.m. July 22 to 7:00 a.m. July 25. The largest recorded maximum rainfall in Texas of 12.8 in. was recorded in Port Arthur, Jefferson County and Freeport, Brazoria County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   12.80 in. (Jefferson Co.)
12.80 in. (Brazoria Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Jefferson Co., Port Arthur
Brazoria Co., Freeport
References:   Schoner and Molansky, 1956; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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41.  
Most of Texas
August 30 to September 5, 1932
Flooding was disastrous over much of Laredo, Piedras Negras, and Eagle Pass. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   19.50 in. (Freestone Co.)
15.50 in. (Schleicher Co.)
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Freestone Co., Fairfield
Schleicher Co., Eldorado
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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42.  
Pecos River and Rio Grande Watersheds
August 26 to September 8, 1932
A very heavy, general storm covered most of the Rio Grande Basin below El Paso and Carlsbad, starting first at the lower end of the basin. The rain produced large peak discharges at several streamflow-gaging stations. The first excessive rainfall was at Muzquiz, Coahuila, Mexico, Aug. 26, and at Fort Davis, Tex., Aug. 27 and 29. Sonora recorded 7.66 in. Aug. 31 and 6.08 in. Sept. 1. The heavy rainfall caused floods of unprecedented size.
Deaths and Damage:   In the United States, flooding killed nine, and damage was estimated at $1 million.
Max. Precipitation:   13.74 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Sutton Co., Sonora
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; International Boundary Commission, 1932

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43.  
Central Texas
June 30 to July 2, 1932
Heavy rain June 30-July 3 on parts of the Nueces and Guadalupe River Basins produced historically significant peak discharges at several streamflow-gaging stations. Very heavy rain fell on the upper Guadalupe River Basin west of Kerrville June 30-July 2. This rain amounted to more than 35 in. during about 36 hours at the State Fish Hatchery above Ingram. Heavy rainfall also was recorded in the Frio and Medina River Basins. Rainfall of 14 in. was measured at Bandera, Lima, and Medina in the Medina River Basin. Vanderpool, at the headwaters of the Medina River, measured 33.5 in. July 1-2. The floods in the Frio River were the highest known at that time. The heaviest rainfall on the Frio River Basin was at Rio Frio in Real County, where 24 in. was recorded July 1-2. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Flash floods were responsible for seven deaths, and property losses exceeded $0.5 million.
Max. Precipitation:   35.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Kerr Co., State Fish Hatchery
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Dalrymple and others, 1937, p. 119-123; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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44.  
South-Central and East Texas
January 3 to 6, 1932
The largest amounts of rainfall occurred in Anderson, Houston, Smith, and Bee Counties. The largest amount recorded was just over 5 in. on the 4th in Anderson County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   7.43 in. (Bee Co.)
6.18 in. (Bastrop Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Bee Co., Beeville
Bastrop Co., Smithville
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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45.  
South Texas
June 26 to 29, 1931
Karnes and Jim Hogg Counties experienced large amounts of rain. 12.5 in. fell on the 27th and 28th in Runge in Karnes County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   12.50 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Karnes Co., Runge
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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46.  
Central Texas
October 4 to 8, 1930
The maximum recorded rainfall of 8.25 in. occurred at Clifton in Van Zandt County. 7.69 in. of rainfall was recorded at Coleman in Coleman County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   8.25 in. (Van Zandt Co.)
7.69 in. (Coleman Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Van Zandt Co., Clifton
Coleman Co., Coleman
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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47.  
East Texas
November 8 to 10, 1929
Over 4 in. of rain fell in Smith County during the 9th and 10th with 3 in. coming on the 9th.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   4.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Smith Co., Tyler
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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48.  
Central and Coastal Texas
May 24 to 31, 1929
Rainfall up to 15.0 in. caused flooding throughout much of the State.
Deaths and Damage:   Much of the damage was in Houston with an estimated cost of $6 million.
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in. (Hays Co.)
12.90 in. (Tyler Co.)
12.20 in. (Harris Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Hays Co., Driftwood
Tyler Co., Rockland
Harris Co., Houston
References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999

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49.  
South Texas
September 21 to 23, 1928
The largest amount of rainfall occurred in Brooks County. About 3 in. of rain fell on the 23rd.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   9.47 in. (San Patricio Co.)
8.25 in. (Maverick Co.)
6.40 in. (Jim Hogg Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   San Patricio Co., Corpus Christi
Maverick Co., Eagle Pass
Jim Hogg Co., Hebbronville
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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50.  
Central and East Texas
October 1 to 2, 1927
The largest amounts of rainfall occurred in Collin, Washington, Limestone, and McLennan Counties; 9 in. of rain fell in Limestone County and 6 in. fell in McLennan County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   9.00 in. (Limestone Co.)
6.00 in. (McLennan Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Limestone Co., Prairie Hill
McLennan Co., Waco
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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51.  
Upper Brazos River Basin
October 15, 1926
Heavy rain fell on a small area around Post, causing flooding on the Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River near Aspermont.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   7.50 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Garza Co., Post
References:   U.S. Geological Survey, unpub. data

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52.  
South and East Texas
April 20 to 24, 1926
Heavy rain caused a large flood on Plum Creek in the Guadalupe River Basin.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   10.05 in. (Uvalde Co.)
9.19 in. (Bastrop Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Uvalde Co., Sabinal
Bastrop Co., Smithville
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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